Not My Will

January 1st, 2018

Sometimes God hands us some difficult circumstances, and if you are anything like me, you find yourself asking, “Why this? Why me? Why now?”

Three and a half years ago, I was four months pregnant with my fourth and just a couple weeks from starting the new homeschool year with my two oldest children. I was (and still am) a busy mom.

Then it happened. One morning I went to strip the sheets off the boys’ bunk bed, and as I was moving the pillow a bug crawled out onto the top of it.

A bed bug.

I was pretty sure I knew what it was, the moment I saw it. But I was in a bit of shock. A bed bug? In my house?! In my son’s bed?!?! Further investigation over the next few weeks revealed a small infestation in the boys’ room and some in our bed as well. As near as we could determine, the problem had originated from a contaminated piece of furniture we’d picked up two months before. We had detected the contamination before bringing that furniture into the house, but it was too late. They’d got us.

Over the next three months after the discovery, it was war. Ryan didn’t want to call in an exterminator, so it was us two against the bugs. Armed with large recycling bags, a clothes dryer, a silicone gun, and a spray bottle of Dawn dishsoap + water (kills them on contact instantly, by the way), we slowly but surely routed out the enemy and annihilated them.

But it wasn’t so easy emotionally. I struggled with the despair and discouragement. Just when you thought you’d seen the last of them, you would find another, and you knew you would have to keep up the weary routine of changing bedding, inspecting bedframes, spraying cracks, bagging clothing, etc., etc., for another indefinite number of weeks.

The social isolation was also difficult. We couldn’t have anyone over to our home, and our family and friends were reluctant to let us into their houses. I couldn’t blame them — I would do the same if I was in their shoes — but at the same time it was hard for me to accept.

As the weeks ticked by, I began to grow more and more worried. I was approaching my due date. How could I deal with this problem when I was in bed recovering from labour? How could I keep up this extermination routine when I had a newborn to care for?

I began to cry out to God: telling my sob story, making bargains, issuing ultimatums, you name it. “Here’s the deadline, God. Solve my problem for me by this date or…”

Or what? Slowly it began to dawn on me that I wasn’t in any position to be making demands. I wasn’t in control, and no amount of threatening or begging God was going to change my circumstances. The only thing I could change was my attitude.

And so I surrendered. If God intended for this bed bug infestation to continue, then I would simply leave the problem in His hands and continue to do what I could with the resources that I had. That could mean setting aside the extermination routine for a few weeks and picking it up again when I was strong enough, or something else. But whatever it took, I would simply do my part, and leave the rest to God.

As it was, God was gracious, and we finished off the last of our unwanted guests about 4 to 6 weeks before the baby was born. But I gleaned a valuable lesson from the experience, one that has stuck with me since then.Difficult circumstances will come and go, and they are beyond my control. But what I can control is my attitude. I can rage against the perceived injustice of God allowing this difficult circumstance in my life. Or I can accept His providence, and do my best to work through the difficult circumstance with the time, energy, and resources that I have, leaning on Him for strength in my moments of weakness. It’s a choice that confronts me daily, and one that confronts all of us at some point or another in our lives.

But I know, as Romans 8:28 says, “that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose.” And so I can rest in this knowledge, that even though I may not understand why God has allowed a difficult circumstance in my life, yet I am assured that He will see it through and use it for my good. There is meaning and hope even in the dark and difficult moments of our life, because the Sovereign Lord of the universe sustains and directs every minute and every minute detail of our existence.

Christmas Newsletter 2017

December 20th, 2017

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

We hope this Christmas newsletter finds all our friends and family well.

This year, after many months of prayer, planning, and preparation, we made a life changing move, the upshot of which is: We are building a house! You can find a shortened version of the construction photo album here.

We are in the process of trying to sell our Toronto home, and are halfway through the construction of the new house, which is located in Markdale, ON, about a two hours’ drive northwest of Toronto, and a 20 min. drive from Ryan’s parents. Ryan has been overseeing the project and building the house largely by himself, with the generous help of his dad, a few hired hands, and the occasional volunteer hours of friends and family.

We are so grateful for all the support and encouragement from family and friends, but are especially indebted to Ryan’s parents, Michael and Marilee, who made a room in their basement for our family to live in during the construction phase, gave us free run of their house, and have contributed so many resources towards helping us. All the help from family and friends has made the transition so much easier.

The kids have been pretty resilient through the process, though they miss their home and friends in the city.

Justin is now 8, and growing in maturity and responsibility. He is sweet-tempered, easy-going, and eager to please. He’s even had a hand in the building of the new house: moving materials, fetching tools, spreading gravel, etc. Justin loves to spend time with friends and family, especially his cousins. His biggest interest continues to be Lego, and he has demonstrated a remarkable ability  in recreating objects that he has only seen in pictures (e.g. a Lego model of the submersible that discovered the sunken Titanic). His reading ability advanced by leaps and bounds this year and he is now reading books on his own.

Patrick turned 7 this year, and is also growing in maturity and responsibility. He too had a hand in building the new house. Patrick is analytical, witty, and a hard worker when he sets his mind to a task. He is quite a monkey at climbing. Patrick also has a great interest in tools and machinery, more than you would expect from a young boy. For example, when Ryan gave him a broken weed wacker for his birthday and told him they would fix it together, you wouldn’t believe the amount of excitement it generated! A chip off the old block, that one.

Oliver is at the grand age of four years and is ever the rowdy one, yet once in a while you can catch a sweet little glimpse of him playing house quietly with his sister Melinda. He is a clever little boy, he loves to tease and joke, and his smiles and giggles are contagious. Oliver is also excited about Lego and playing with his older brothers and cousins. He has a big imagination and is full of ideas of things to do and games to play.

Melinda will be turning 3 just after Christmas. She is a “kleine moeder,” that is, a “little mother.” Melinda is very observant, and can help me find things when I’ve forgotten where I placed them. She likes to help with the housework, although sometimes she will re-organize things to suit her own tastes. She has quite a vocabulary, and will tell you in no uncertain terms that she won’t eat salsa because it has “halapeenyos” in it, and is, as such, too “picy” for her. She keeps me on my toes. She loves to play with PlayDoh and her toy kitty, and loves to read books with Mommy.

Serena is 1 1/2 years old. She is our sweet little cherub with big blue eyes and wispy blonde curls. Almost everyone who sees her comments on how bright her blue eyes are and what a big beautiful smile she has. And she is fairly easy to coax a smile out of, much to our delight. You can often find Serena tagging along with her older siblings, especially Melinda and Oliver. She loves dolls, and will wrap her babies in just about any bit of clothing she can find, so after a few embarrassing incidents, we try to keep our dresser drawers tight shut and our laundry out of her sight.

Ryan and I are still happily in love–which is good because our 10th anniversary is fast approaching (in May 2018). This year has had its ups and downs for us, with the stresses of trying to sell, trying to build, trying to homeschool, and trying to find time for the kids, each other, and all our many other responsibilities. It’s been little chaotic, to say the least, but God has been good to us, and we have been growing closer together through it all.

A Blessed Christmas, from our family to yours.

The Kidds

Christmas Newsletter 2016

December 8th, 2016

Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year!

Well, the first half of this year was rather a wild ride for us, but we have a lot to praise and thank God for, as many of our friends and family already know.

Last Christmas (December 2015) we had the delightful surprise of discovering that another precious child was on the way. Then in late January we were told that an ultrasound had found a subchorionic hemorrhage, which threatened the pregnancy and the baby. Over the next three and a half months, I was in bedrest most of the time and Ryan worked from home in order to help manage the children and household chores. We had the support of family and friends during those months, through prayer, meals, childcare, etc., which meant a lot to us and helped to ease the burden. I was eventually induced and Serena Hope Kidd was born on May 17th — my 30th birthday.

Yet that was not the end of our difficulties, as shortly after her birth little Serena was laboring to breathe, and an x-ray revealed a hole in her lung. Over the next few hours her condition rapidly deteriorated, and Ryan and I began to fear for her life. Serena was transferred to Sick Kids, where she bounced back quickly, praise God, and after a week in the NICU we were able to take her home.

It was a wonderful, busy summer and fall, with Ryan at home on extended paternity leave and five little kiddos filling our home with fun and laughter.

Some of the highlights of the year include: birthdays; Serena’s baptism party; summer vacations, long weekends, and holidays spent with both sides of the family; my brother’s wedding; family time at our property up north; having a sweet new baby in the house; etc.

Justin is seven years old now. He continues to be an outgoing, active young boy with a big imagination and a heart of gold. After school is over for the day, you will often find him playing in the backyard with his cousins. If not there, he’ll be building something with Legos or filling reams of paper with action-packed drawings and pictures. I am pretty proud of him for the way he will help and care for his little siblings, even without being asked, and how reliable he is with running little errands for me.

Patrick is just over six years old. He’s a pretty strong and agile boy, and he can climb a wall or tree like a monkey. Patrick shares his father’s interest in machinery and man projects, and it’s not unusual to see him working alongside Ryan or discussing how to fix things with him. The two of them like to scheme together behind my back (or right in front of me) to buy machines like snowmobiles, tractors, and excavators. Patrick is attentive to detail and can be fairly thorough in his work.

Oliver is three, and still our little sunshine. His big blue eyes sparkle with mischief and fun, and his smile and giggle are incredibly contagious. You can’t ever miss him if he’s in a room with you, as he will always make his presence known. He loves being around people and being involved in what they are doing, and will often be found playing with his older brothers or his cousins. He adores his baby sister, as do his older brothers, and like them he attempts to smother little Serena daily with kisses.

Melinda is almost two, and she’s a busy, intelligent little girl. She already had a growing vocabulary by 16 months, and now she’s saying whole sentences, asking questions, making requests, etc. She’s got her own ideas about how to run the house, and it’s a race every day to stay ahead of her! That said, she can be very sweet, and she likes to help Mommy and her brothers with their chores. Her favourite toy is her pink kitty, which she hugs at night as she falls asleep.

Well, you’ve already seen Serena about 4 times (all of the kids wanted their picture taken with Serena, including Patrick, although in each of his photos with her he was looking at Serena and not at the camera…). However, I still wanted to include a photo of her all by herself…

Serena is our sweet little doll of a baby, with big blue eyes, long dark lashes, and plenty of chub. Now over six months old, she delights all of us with her big sweet smiles, her coos, and her laughter. She’s an irresistible little bundle of joy, and we are so privileged to have her as one of our family.

Ryan and I have our hands full — full of blessings from God. Sometimes having so many blessings proves to be quite a challenge, but overall we are thankful and happy for the wonderful life God has given us.

And we are eternally thankful for the gift of His precious Son, whom we celebrate at this time of the year. We could not have such a spirit of joy were it not for the hope that we have received through Him.

To God be the glory, great things He has done!

Praising God for Our Precious Child

May 19th, 2016

With deepest joy and gratitude to God for the arrival

of our precious baby, we would like to announce

the birth of our fifth child,

Serena Hope Kidd

born at 3:50 am on Tuesday, May 17, 2016

weighing 5 lbs. 7 oz. (2.4 kg.)

_________________________________________________

Baptism

Serena will be baptized at

2:45 pm, on Sunday, June 12, 2016

at the New Horizon Church in Scarborough

(Bridletowne Park Church, 2300 Bridletowne Circle)

See www.newhorizonchurch.ca/wp/map for directions.

All are welcome to attend.

_________________________

Serena, 7 days old, with brother Justin at the homecoming party

_____________________

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What are the baby’s birth specifications? A: weight: 5 lbs., 7 oz. (2.4 kg);  length:  19 in. (48 cm); dark hair.
  2. How long was Kristin’s labour? A: 2.5 hours from start of established labour to birth.
  3. Where was the birth? A: The baby was born at Scarborough Grace Hospital.
  4. Were there any complications? A: due to a subchorionic hemorrhage and a pregnancy-induced liver function disorder, the obstetrician considered it best to induce labour 3 weeks early. After unsuccessful attempts to induce labour with gel and breaking of the waters, labour was finally established through intravenous oxytocin.
  5. Are mother and baby well? Mother is well, however, little Serena was transferred to the NICU at Sick Kids Hospital on account of complications affecting her lungs and breathing. She made steady progress in her recovery and was sent home a week later with a clean bill of health, for which we are very thankful.
  6. How is breastfeeding? A: Serena was initially receiving fluids through IV, was then introduced to milk feedings through a nasal tube into her stomach, and is now breastfeeding exclusively and is doing well.
  7. Why did you name the baby Serena Hope?  A:  The name Serena means “serene, calm, peaceful.” The name Hope means, well, “hope.” We chose the name some months ago, long before we realized how tumultuous and difficult the day of her birth would become, and how fitting her name would prove to be. God was our Rock, giving us hope in the midst of the storm, shielding our tiny baby girl. We knew that, whatever the outcome of those first 24 hours, little Serena Hope was in His Almighty hands.
  8. What is the baby’s theme verse? A: God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore we will not fear, even though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea (Psalm 46:1-2).
  9. Fun fact: Serena was born on Kristin’s 30th birthday. She is the best birthday gift Kristin has ever received. :)
  10. Why are you choosing to baptize your baby? A: We do not believe baptism will make the baby go to heaven automatically.  But just as male babies received the covenant sign of circumcision in the Old Testament, we believe that God requires us to put His mark of ownership on our children, and in baptism He promises to save our children as they grow up to receive the covenant promises, repenting of their sins personally and learning to love and obey the Lord Jesus.
  11. Do you need meals or anything else? A:  We are very thankful for all the support we have been receiving from family and friends. The other four children were in the wonderful caring hands of their grandparents for the week that Serena was in the NICU, but are now home again.
  12. Donations in honour of? If you want to give a gift in honour of Serena, we might suggest sending a donation to the Christian Blind Mission.   CBM provides eye operations and life impacting treatments to children in the third world who are truly in need.  International Justice Mission also does good work and it accepts international donations.

 

Thank you all for your love and prayers for us at this precious time!

What is Homeschooling?

March 14th, 2016

by Kristin

A lot of parents, particularly mothers, think “I could never homeschool.”

For them, the idea  of homeschooling evokes visions of perfect, smiling mothers that are divinely gifted with infinite patience, super-human intelligence, and extraordinary organizational skills. These perfect mothers run the equivalent of a high-class private school in their homes, with perfect, quiet, studious children sitting at polished desks from 7:00 in the morning to 4:00 in the afternoon, learning three languages, a dozen musical instruments, trigonometry, physics, advanced grammar, theology, early church history, and economics. After school, this perfect mother simply waves her magic wand, her perfectly obedient children run to do her bidding, and the housework is resolved in minutes while a four course dinner appears on the table at precisely 5:00pm as her husband steps in the door.

I’m half-choked with laughing.

The reality of homeschooling is so vastly different from this. Are homeschooling mothers perfect? No! Are  we infinitely patient? No! Are we super intelligent and organized? Definitely not!

So how do we succeed at this homeschooling business then? What IS homeschooling anyway?

Homeschooling is an act of faith. You read what God says in His Word about raising children, about training them to love Him and to obey His Word (Deut. 6:1-9), and you realize that God is calling you to this, calling you to disciple your children for Him. And how can you disciple them when you are separated from them for the majority of their waking hours almost every day? And how can one to two hours of Sunday school or after-supper devotions compete with 30+ hours of humanist indoctrination every week in public schools?

So you as a parent take a step of faith, and keep your children home.

Homeschooling is a lifestyle. You are not re-creating your home into an institution. Home is still home. It’s where we live, share meals, do chores, play games, laugh, and relax. Now it’s also the place where we learn.

But learning is not restricted to superficial time slots, nor is it limited to lesson plans, workbooks, and test sheets. We are raising people, not computers. Education is about lighting a fire, not filling a database. There’s so much more to life and learning than simply memorizing multiplication tables and the dates of key historical events, important as those things are.

We need to teach the whole child: mind, body, and soul. Involve them in baking to learn fractions. Let them watch a sunflower grow from a seed. Teach them to care for a younger sibling and respect their parents. Bring a tadpole or a butterfly cocoon home for them to observe over time. Give them art and craft supplies. Read them timeless storybooks and stories about real people and places like Little House on the Prairie. Read, read, READ to them. Have them sort laundry by colour and put their toys away into organized bins. Give them puzzles and blocks and other open-ended toys that involve so much imagination and creativity. Teach them to ride a bike. Help them make cookies for an elderly neighbour. Teach them about God and His love for them.

Homeschooling is a vision for the future. Homeschooling is not just a daily exercise. We are giving our time, energy, and resources for the purpose of raising a godly generation to follow after us, for the glory of God. We are laying the foundation for not just our children’s lives as servants of the King, but for, Lord willing, a whole line of faithful descendants!

Such a long-term vision will drastically affect our choices of today. It will influence what curriculum we use, what activities our children are in, what we watch on TV, what books we read to the kids, who we socialize with, etc. We will make distinctions not only between what’s good and bad for our kids, but also between what’s good and what’s excellent. There’s only so much we can do in a day to prepare for the future, and so we need to make careful decisions about what will be the best use of our time and resources, and the best use of our children’s time and resources.

Think of it as building a Cathedral. Cathedrals take decades to build. Only the best materials are chosen and incorporated into the building. The different elements are handcrafted with great care and attention to detail by skilled craftsmen. They are adorned with breathtaking frescoes by gifted artists. They are filled with costly and beautiful objects. The whole Cathedral, inside and out, stands as a monument to the glory of God for centuries.

Homeschooling children is just like that.

However, like some of those who plan, design, and begin to build a Cathedral, we may never see the full fruition of our work. We do not know what our children’s children will do with the godly heritage we are seeking to prepare for them. But we know that we are doing the work that God has called us to, and we know that God promises to bless us when we step out obediently in faith.

And so we move forward with a vision and a hope, with our children in our hearts and in our homes.

* * * * *

If you are interested in giving homeschooling a try, or understand that God is calling you to disciple your children in this way, I would encourage you to check out the books below:

Educating the Wholehearted Child, Clay and Sally Clarkson

A Charlotte Mason Companion, Karen Andreola

Home Grown Kids, Dr. Raymond Moore

I would also mention that Montessori materials and the Montessori approach of hands-on learning are also wonderful for teaching young children. The math materials in particular, in my experience, provide a solid foundation for young minds to comprehend this abstract subject.

 

 

Keeping Your Children Home

March 13th, 2016

by Kristin

I’m in the middle of reading a book by Dr. Raymond Moore (namely, Home Grown Kids). Dr. Moore is a developmental psychologist and a strong advocate of homeschooling and of delaying formal education (see School Can Wait and Better Late Than Early by Dr. Moore). He stresses again and again the psychological benefits of young children staying at home under the loving care of their parents.

I find it deeply saddening to see so many parents following the popular culture in sending their precious children off to school at an increasingly younger age.

Granted, some families are in a position such that they have little choice but to enlist childcare outside the home. However, at the same time, there are many parents who do have a choice but don’t seem to realize that their personal love and care and training is far more important to their child’s development than anything the best preschool or daycare could provide.

Having said this, I realize that many mothers and fathers lack confidence to keep their children at home. We have been brainwashed as a culture into thinking that everything needs to be done by experts, most especially the delicate business of raising children. We have pediatricians, child psychologists, early childhood educators, teachers, school nurses, child psychiatrists, etc., etc. From the moment the child is born until the time he reaches adulthood, we have someone with a degree telling us when he should sleep, what he should eat, how he should play, who he should socialize with, what he should learn and when, and on and on and on, ad infinitum.

But is this really necessary? Did Abraham Lincoln have a child psychologist? Did Mozart need an early childhood educator? Did Thomas Edison need a school teacher?

The point is, No, you as a parent do not need a panel of experts to help you raise your child. This is a modern development, and quite frankly, it’s had more of a negative impact than a positive one. For example, simply compare the level of education today with what a child received 100 to 200 years ago, and you’ll see what I mean. For all their “expertise,” today’s experts don’t have much to show for their efforts.

This may be true, you say, but where is a parent to begin? How will a parent know what to do? What about specialized areas?

[Granted, there are times when you as a parent need specialized help, for example, when your child is very sick, when he has a disorder, when he needs more specialized training/education, etc.].

First questions first. Where do you begin? How will you know what to do?

Start with the Bible. Learn all of what God says about raising children. He made them after all, so He knows how they tick.

Then find solid Christian child training resources that are based on God’s Word (e.g. Shepherding a Child’s Heart, by Tedd Tripp). Remember, your first priority as a parent is always moral instruction: shaping your child’s character, teaching obedience to God, etc. This is the foundation for all other education.

Don’t believe me? Try teaching arithmetic to a child having a temper tantrum.

See what I mean? The moral training is necessary before any other training or instruction can take place. Even if you find ways to get around this, you won’t score any points in the end when you produce evil geniuses of your offspring. (Note: you’ll observe that schools nowadays are woefully lacking in any moral training [or rather, they're excelling in immoral training], which is another good reason to teach your kids at home!).

Furthermore, this moral training — or “soul training” if you will — is foundational because it is the eternal aspect of parenting. One day your child will stand before God. Preparing him for that moment is infinitely more important than preparing him for highschool, or college, or his first job, etc. We must be so careful as Christian parents not to put on the same narrow blinders that the secular parents around us are wearing. This life is not all there is, as our secular counterparts so naively believe. We need to prepare our children first and foremost for their eternal future, and equip them to do the eternal work Jesus has prepared for them to do on this earth.

If you are interested to learn more, check out my small sample of resources below, and stay tuned for my next post, “What is Homeschooling?

 

Resources:

See this website for a list of great men and women of history who were homeschooled: http://www.homeschoolacademy.com/a/famoushomeschoolers/

Repairing the Ruins, ed. Douglas Wilson

On Secular Education, R. L. Dabney

The Abolition of Man, C. S. Lewis

Shepherding a Child’s Heart, Tedd Tripp

Home Grown Kids, School Can Wait, and Better Late Than Early by Raymond Moore

 

A Belated Christmas Announcement

March 12th, 2016

by Kristin

We had a little Christmas surprise (or rather, a big one) that we wanted to share with you.

We’re having another baby! Baby Kidd #5 is due June 6, 2016.

However, we have been facing some complications with the pregnancy, and there’s a significant risk that the baby could come prematurely. We would appreciate your prayers for this little one at this time.

~The Kidds~

How Can I Keep From Singing?

December 18th, 2015

I love the beautiful old hymns, and this one which I stumbled across recently is a real treasure. Enjoy.  -Kristin

Hymn by Robert Lowry

My life flows on in endless song;
Above earth’s lamentation,
I catch the sweet, though far-off hymn
That hails a new creation.

Refrain:
No storm can shake my inmost calm
While to that Rock I’m clinging.
Since Christ is Lord of heaven and earth,
How can I keep from singing?

Through all the tumult and the strife,
I hear that music ringing.
It finds an echo in my soul.
How can I keep from singing? [Refrain]

What though my joys and comforts die?
I know my Savior liveth.
What though the darkness gather round?
Songs in the night He giveth. [Refrain]

The peace of Christ makes fresh my heart,
A fountain ever springing!
All things are mine since I am His!
How can I keep from singing? [Refrain]

Christmas Newsletter 2015

December 9th, 2015

Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year!

Time flies when you’re having fun. God has been very good to us again this year. Some of the highlights of 2015 include:

Spending the holidays with family.

Camping and cottaging with family.

Two family weddings (Kristin’s cousins).

Lots of weekends spent enjoying and improving our new property up north.

Assembling tandem bikes with the kids for Ryan’s hobby business.

Having a 10′ inflatable pool in the backyard and teaching the kids to be comfortable in the water.

Enjoying our new little daughter and sister, Melinda Joy, who arrived late in December of 2014.

Homeschooling the boys; learning about ancient and medieval time periods together.

Birthday parties for the kids.

Reading lots of exciting books as a family.

And the list could go on….

The kids are growing fast.

Justin is six years old now, outgoing, enthusiastic, a little precocious and a little scattered. He has a caring heart, a bright mind, a boundless imagination, and a restless energy about him. He loves Lego, play-acting, dress-up (soldiers, knights, etc.), and drawing.

Patrick is five years old, sensitive, thoughtful, and a little headstrong at times. He’s a real homebody, and tends to be quiet and shy when around other people. Like Justin, he too loves Lego, play-acting and dress-up, but Patrick gets especially excited about working with Daddy, and talking about tools, machinery, and heavy equipment.

Oliver is two and a half years old. He is funny, energetic, enthusiastic, and into everything like a dirty shirt! If his older brothers can do it, so can he, whether it be drawing, play-acting, building Lego, doing school, building forts, climbing dirt piles and boulders, etc., etc. There’s no holding this little guy back. He smiles almost all the time, and he’s like a ray of sunshine in the family.

Melinda is the new girl on the block. She’s learning how to survive with three older brothers, and how to fend for herself. She is beginning to cruise the furniture, and can wiggle across the floor like a fish in water. Melinda loves oranges, her toy cat, and playtime with her brothers, mommy, and daddy. She likes to listen to us sing hymns and read stories. The boys are pretty thrilled to have a little sister, and it’s clear that she loves them all too.

A very Merry Christmas from our family to yours. May God bless you richly in the coming year.

 

What Do You Read?

November 17th, 2015

by Kristin

Are you a reader? You should be. My life and thought has been vastly shaped by books I have read. Here follows a list of different books I would recommend to others, and I hope you will take the time to read them too if you can.

 

For Homeschoolers

Educating the WholeHearted Child, Clay and Sally Clarkson

On Secular Education, R. L. Dabney, edited by Douglas Wilson

Repairing the Ruins, Douglas Wilson

A Charlotte Mason Companion, Karen Andreola

Teaching the Trivium, Harvey Bluedorn

The Well-Educated Mind, Susan Wise Bauer

 

For Moms/Parents

Loving the Little Years: Motherhood in the Trenches, Rachel Jankovic

Fit to Burst, Rachel Jankovic

Queen of the Home, Jennifer McBride

Seasons of a Mother’s Heart, Sally Clarkson

Large Family Logistics, Kim Brenneman

The Hidden Art of Homemaking, Edith Schaeffer

Raising Real Men, Hal and Melanie Young

Future Men, Douglas Wilson

 

For Wives

For Women Only, Shaunti Feldhahn

The Fruit of Her Hands, Nancy Wilson

 

Other

Amusing Ourselves to Death, Neil Postman

The Closing of the American Mind, Allan Bloom

New Evidence that Demands a Verdict, Josh McDowell

Refuting Evolution and Refuting Evolution 2, Jonathan Sarfati

 

 

Happy Reading!